Fabien Jobard bei der American Society of Criminology (November)

am 24. September 2018

2 min read duration


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Fabien Jobard hält bei der Jahrestagung der American Society of Criminology in Atlanta (Georgia), 14.-17.11.2018, einen über unser Teilprojekt "Punitivität im Vergleich" mit dem Titel " Judges', prosecutors' and ordinary people's decisions on petty crime in France and Germany".

Abstract : "Public opinion usually considers criminal justice to be too permissive and lenient. Research in criminology exploring attitudes on crime and criminal justice in different countries has also revealed the following paradox: if one confronts ordinary people with specific cases instead of assessing general attitudes, the respondents turn out to be even milder than judges. Building on this, Fabien Jobard (France, CNRS, Cesdip), Kirstin Drenkhahn (Germany, Freie Universität Berlin) and Tobias Singelnstein (Germany, Ruhr University, Bochum) conducted a representative population online survey in Germany and France (n = 2x3000 people) and also surveyed French and German judges and prosecutors with the same instrument. The questionnaire consisted of vignettes with short criminal cases (petty crime shoplifting to domestic violence) and a range of possible sanctions that respondents could choose. The results show that the usual dichotomization into mild/harsh does not grasp the discrepancy of sentencing between legal practitioners and laypersons. Our results also display that sentences chosen by German and French respondents from the general population are closer to each other than those of German judges and German general population or those of their French counterparts. This suggests a common European culture regarding criminal matters that goes beyond national differences."

Fabien Jobard hält bei der Jahrestagung der American Society of Criminology in Atlanta (Georgia), 14.-17.11.2018, einen über unser Teilprojekt "Punitivität im Vergleich" mit dem Titel " Judges', prosecutors' and ordinary people's decisions on petty crime in France and Germany".

Abstract : "Public opinion usually considers criminal justice to be too permissive and lenient. Research in criminology exploring attitudes on crime and criminal justice in different countries has also revealed the following paradox: if one confronts ordinary people with specific cases instead of assessing general attitudes, the respondents turn out to be even milder than judges. Building on this, Fabien Jobard (France, CNRS, Cesdip), Kirstin Drenkhahn (Germany, Freie Universität Berlin) and Tobias Singelnstein (Germany, Ruhr University, Bochum) conducted a representative population online survey in Germany and France (n = 2x3000 people) and also surveyed French and German judges and prosecutors with the same instrument. The questionnaire consisted of vignettes with short criminal cases (petty crime shoplifting to domestic violence) and a range of possible sanctions that respondents could choose. The results show that the usual dichotomization into mild/harsh does not grasp the discrepancy of sentencing between legal practitioners and laypersons. Our results also display that sentences chosen by German and French respondents from the general population are closer to each other than those of German judges and German general population or those of their French counterparts. This suggests a common European culture regarding criminal matters that goes beyond national differences."


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